Book of the Week – Laboulaye’s Fairy Book

Laboulaye’s Fairy Book. Fairy tales of all Nations
Edouard Laboulaye (1811-1883)
New York: Harper, 1867
First edition in English
PN6071 F15 L33 1867

Translated from French into English by Mary Louise Booth (1831-1889). Edouard Laboulaye added a special preface to this American edition. Twelve tales are included, two of which are quite long. Illustrated with black-and-white pen-and-ink drawings.

Live Broadcast of Vesalius Lecture

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Watch the live broadcast of tonight’s lecture, Renaissance Man: The Art and Science of Andreas Vesalius.

http://lib.utah.edu/services/knowledge-commons/live-broadcast/
Mark Nielsen 8x11 copy 2

September 18, 2014

Lecture: Gould Auditorium, J. Willard Marriott Library, Level 1, 6:30 PM

Reception: Special Collections Gallery, Level 4, 7:30 PM

A 45 minute tour of the exhibitions will begin at 5:30 at the west entrance, Level 1, of the J. Willard Marriott Library.

Learn more about Mark Nielsen.

 

Join Us!

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Mark Nielsen 8x11 copy 2

September 18, 2014

Lecture: Gould Auditorium, J. Willard Marriott Library, Level 1, 6:30 PM

Reception: Special Collections Gallery, Level 4, 7:30 PM

A 45 minute tour of the exhibitions will begin at 5:30 at the west entrance, Level 1, of the J. Willard Marriott Library.

Learn more about Mark Nielsen.

 

You Are Invited

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Mark Nielsen 8x11 copy 2

September 18, 2014

Lecture: Gould Auditorium, J. Willard Marriott Library, Level 1, 6:30 PM

Reception: Special Collections Gallery, Level 4, 7:30 PM

A 45 minute tour of the exhibitions will begin at 5:30 at the west entrance, Level 1, of the J. Willard Marriott Library.

Learn more about Mark Nielsen.

 

Book of the Week – The American Ladies’ Memorial: an Indispensable…

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The American Ladies’ Memorial: an Indispensable…
Boston: Published at 60 ½ Cornhill, 1850
First edition
HQ1221 A534 1850

A guide to acceptable behavior for nineteenth-century American ladies, with emphasis on acceptable occupations and amusements. From this little book, the lady may learn about etiquette, embroidery, lacework, dress-making, millinery, floral arrangements, toilette and much, much more. The lady is helped with woodcut illustrations throughout, including numerous embroidery and lacework patterns. Yellow printed wrappers, stitched at the spine.

Book of the Week – The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Mark Twain (1835-1910)
Hartford, CT: American Pub. Co.; San Francisco, CA: A. Roman, 1876
First American edition, first printing
PS1306-A1-1876

Mark Twain (Samuel Clemons) wrote three different versions of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer between 1872 and 1875 before it was first published in London in June, 1876. Many American authors preferred to have their books published first in England, since that was the only way to secure British copyright. First printings in England, and then the United States, usually occurred only a couple of months apart. In the case of Tom Sawyer, the delay was longer, frustrating Twain. Too much of a delay often resulted in piracy, which is exactly what happened in the case of this work. At least one pirated edition surfaced in July in Canada. Twain believed that the delay and the piracy caused him loss in royalties. Tom Sawyer was reviewed unfavorably in the London Examiner, the day it came out. A July review in the literary magazine, The Atheneaum, was more kindly. In December 1876, Tom Sawyer was printed in the United States and sold by subscription only. This was a common method of book distribution in the United States during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Book agents would cross the country with a publisher’s prospectus, selling and placing orders for as yet unpublished titles. Once the title was released the books would be delivered directly to subscriber’s homes. Only later editions were available in bookstores. Tom Sawyer was not an immediate success. The American publisher sold only 24,000 copies in its first year. The pirated edition was not the only reason for poor sales. One book agent in California complained that the story, at only 274 pages, was not long enough. Potential subscribers apparently felt the same way. Twain typed the manuscript for Tom, and later claimed that it was the first typewritten manuscript. Historians, however, believe that this distinction goes to Twain’s Life on the Mississippi. The frontispiece of the first American edition was drawn by Twain. Publisher’s advertisements, dated Dec. 1, 1876 on two leaves in back.

Book of the Week – Immediate Epic; the final statement of the plan…

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Immediate Epic; the final statement of the plan…
Upton Sinclair (1878-1968)
Los Angeles, CA: End Poverty League, 1934?
HC107 C2 S53

Author and socialist Upton Sinclair won the Democratic nomination for governor of California in August 1934. He based his campaign on his “End Poverty in California” (EPIC) plan. Sinclair called for tax reform, including a repeal of the sales tax, legislature for a graduated state income tax (to 30% for those earning $50,000 per year), an increase in state inheritance tax, an increase in taxes of privately owned public utility companies and banks, a pension of $50 per month to needy persons over the age of sixty, a payment of $50 per month to the disabled, and a pension of $50 per month to widows with dependent children. He lost the governorship by 260,000 votes to a Republican campaign that labeled him as an atheist, a communist and a “crackpot.” Sinclair claimed only 37% of the vote, but the Republican candidate received only 48%. A third party candidate received 13%. The turnout for this election was quite large, demonstrating a strong response from the public for politicians to bring the nation out of the Great Depression. Sinclair’s campaign drew national and international attention. In November, 1934, the Montreal Gazette wrote, “It will be surprising if the Californians vote for a plan that calls for yet more taxation.” And, indeed, they did not.

Book of the Week – An Alphabetical Compendium of Various Sects…

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An Alphabetical Compendium of Various Sects…
Hannah Adams (1755-1831)
Boston: Printed by B. Edes & Sons, 1784
First edition
BL31 A3 1784

Hannah Adams was the first woman in the United States to make a living as writer. Born in Massachusetts, Adams was a distant cousin of President John Adams and the daughter of a lifelong bibliophile called “Book” Adams, who failed an attempt at bookselling. Too frail to go to school, she was taught Latin, Greek, geography and logic to theological students who boarded with her family. One of the students introduced her to Broughton’s Dictionary of Religions, which led to her interest in writing on religion. At the age of seventeen, her father faced bankruptcy. Adams helped sustain the family by selling her lace and by teaching. The sale of her books added to her income. Alphabetical Compendium was an important contribution to American religious literature. In her book, Adams (a Unitarian) represented denominations from the perspective of their adherents, without injecting her own opinions. It includes one of the earliest accounts of the Shakers and a description of contemporary Jewry. This work went through four editions in the United States, each under a different title, and was also published in England.

Book of the Week – Notes on the State of Virginia

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Notes on the State of Virginia
Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826)
Philadelphia: Printed for Mathew Carey, 1794
Second American edition

The second American edition of Notes included a large folding map of Virginia made by Samuel Lewis not in the first edition and a folding chart listing Indian tribes. Written in the form of answers to questions about Virginia, Notes included information about the geography and social and political life of Virginia. Jefferson also used it as a forum for patriotism, expressing great optimism in regard to the future of the fledgling United States of America. He supported this argument with a dissertation about the nature of the good society as reflected in his home state of Virginia. He discussed constitutional principles such as the separation of church and state, the importance of the system of checks and balances in a constitutional government and the need and right for individual liberty. He passionately refuted a theory posited by the contemporary French naturalist Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon (1707-1788), who stated that nature – plant life, animal life and human life – degenerated in the New World. In two different chapters, Jefferson discussed slavery, with tortuous attempts to explain and justify American slavery. Jefferson, in fact, held sway with contemporary Enlightenment belief that blacks were inferior to whites (whites were more beautiful and more intelligent). He argued for the mass deportation of slaves toward the common good of whites and blacks, slavery being demoralizing to both races. He suggested education and emancipation for slaves, and then colonization of emancipated slave children outside of the United States. Very outside, in fact. He did not suggest that they colonize any part of the North American continent.

Book of the Week – The Ladies Calling, in two parts by the author of…

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The Ladies Calling, in two parts by the author of…
Richard Allestree (1619-1681)
Oxford: Printed at the Theater, 1673
First edition
BJ1609 A45 1673

Authorship of this work is variously attributed to Lady Dorothy Pakington, Richard Stern, and others, but most frequently to Richard Allestree. Allestree was a student of Christ Church and considered a protégé. His later works were among the most popular of those in English published by the Oxford University press at the time. The Ladies Calling went through five editions within four years, republished into the 1720s. In this work, Allestree wrote, “[L]adies need not be much at a loss how to entertain themselves, nor run abroad in a romantic quest after foreign divertissements, when they have such variety of engagements at home.” Allestree appeared to question the opinion that women were “naturally inferior to men.” He suggested that inequality between the sexes come down to a matter of educational opportunity, “and truly had women same advantage, I dare not say but they would make as good returns of it.” Still, Allestree believed that the female predicament was caused by “the first woman’s disobedience to God” and “that she (and all derived from her) should be subject to the husband.”